skip to Main Content

Bird of the Week: Black-throated Green Warbler

  • May 13, 2020

May is an exciting time in Michigan. Harsh cold snaps have finally given way to sunnier days and lush green backdrops have replaced the emptiness left after months of cold snow. For birders though, the wonder of May lies in the fact that it is peak migration season for many songbirds. Among those is the Black-throated Green Warbler, a small bird whose plumage is more yellow than green at first look. If you’re interested in spotting them, make sure too…

Read More

Bird of the Week: Prothonotary Warbler

  • May 13, 2020

Prothonotary Warbler, hard to pronounce, hard to find! The Pro-tho-notary or pro-thon-otary warbler is a bright yellow warbler with blueish-gray wings. It makes its home in wooded wetlands, with a strong preference for river flood plains. It competes for nesting cavities with house wrens and is a favorite host for cowbird eggs. Tough luck! If they can find a home, they might end up raising some other species babies. You can find this elusive bird along the banks of the…

Read More

Bird of the Week: Yellow-rumped Warbler

  • May 6, 2020

For birders in southeast Michigan, the beginning of May is an exciting time of the year as it’s the start of the great spring warbler migration in North America. 54 species are found throughout the continent, 35 of which have been spotted in one of your 13 Metroparks. One of the most common and widespread warbler species in the United States is the Yellow-rumped Warbler, which migrates in hoards twice a year. Often referred to as the “Butterbutt Warbler” due…

Read More

Bird of the Week: Yellow Warbler

  • May 6, 2020

One of the most common warblers in North America, the conspicuously bright Yellow Warbler begins its northward spring migration during the first weeks of April, which is earlier that most other warblers. Like many of the over 50 warbler species found in North America, the Yellow Warbler overwinters in South America and is known to fly nearly 800 miles across the Gulf of Mexico in a single nonstop journey. These small bright yellow birds begin nesting in wooded areas near…

Read More

Bird of the Week: Eastern Bluebird

  • April 28, 2020

One of the birds that many people look for to signal the return of spring is the Eastern Bluebird. However, many Bluebirds over-winter in our area, which gives them the first pick of the best nesting areas come spring. At one time Bluebird numbers were declining across North America, but with the help of conservation efforts such as habitat protection and nesting boxes, Bluebird numbers are on the rise. As you drive through Kensington Metropark you will notice several bird…

Read More

Bird of the Week: Wood Duck

  • April 22, 2020

Once referred to as a "glowing gem" by Henry David Thoreau, the male wood duck is a most magnificent sight, and each wood duck's life starts with an equally magnificent journey. Female wood ducks nest in tree cavities about 25 feet high. She will lay 6-15 eggs, though she may have to raise up to 30 hatchlings due to intraspecific brood parasitism. This occurs when a female wood duck sneaks into the cavity of another hen and adds her eggs…

Read More

Bird of the Week: Red-winged Blackbird

  • April 22, 2020

One of the most common (and loudest) visitors at Kensington is the red-winged blackbird. Found all across the country in wet and marshy habitats, this migrator returns toward the end of February, beating out the Robin as the true harbinger of spring. Listen for the distinctive "look-at-me" call of the male red-winged blackbird as he displays his bright red shoulder patches. The less recognizable female red-winged blackbird can often be found flitting around in the cattails preparing her nest. Her…

Read More

Bird of the Week: Osprey

  • April 16, 2020

As we transition from winter to spring, many migratory birds are flying north to call Michigan their summer home, among these birds are Osprey. During the last two weeks of March, telephone poles, cell phone towers and light posts will begin to serve as perching spots for these unique birds of prey (right). Travelling from as far as South America, Ospreys come to Michigan to breed when they are two years old. They spend their entire first year in their…

Read More

Bird of the Week: Northern Flicker

  • April 16, 2020

The Northern Flicker is only one of eight species of woodpecker in Michigan, and its looks and behavior are unique among the rest. From the tip of the beak to the tip of the tail, the Northern Flicker measures at 12 inches, falling second behind the Pileated Woodpecker, who reaches a length of 19 inches! Their light brown bodies are covered in black, scalloped shaped spots. A black crescent, resembling the shape of a bib, sits just above the breast…

Read More
Back To Top
×Close search
Search